Flying High

Still on the Standing Stones of Callenish, this image relates to the energies of Earth, Fire, Air and Water. I find I’m adding water more to artwork these days, in recognition of climate change and the rising power of the water element in Mother Nature.

Again I’m indebted to Dina, for her kind permission to use the images of the Standing Stones of Callenish in photos she took during a visit to the Orkneys. Her blog and messages from the wonderful Bookfayries can be found at: The World According to Dina. 

Soul Journeying

Images of the soul’s journey at the material and spiritual level, the dots representing experiences and learning, the crow journeying to the sacred spaces, and the feathers representing the ability to fly to new heights as we accumulate experience, knowledge & wisdom.

Spirit Soaring

I created this with a blank canvas and a photo I took of a pansy with a centre which looks like an eagle in flight. An eagle aloft not only gives you perspective, it  shows how strong you are when you following your own songlines home to your soul. When your heart sings, when you are in alignment with your heart, your spirit soars and you feel at peace.That’s the essence of this piece of digital art.

Spirit in Flight
Spirit Soaring

Spirit of Wollumbin

Today I decided to go for something simple and that is remembering the feeling of setting foot on Wollumbin, the Aboriginal term for Mt Warning, a big mountain on the coast of far north New South Wales, Australia.

As you drive up the coast from New South Wales or down the coast from Brisbane, you can’t miss Wollumbin because it is so large and so distinctive. We visited it with a friend and found the ancient rainforest absolutely fascinating. When you step onto the soil of Wollumbin you can feel the warmth and welcome, plus the sense of great age.  Many people climb to the top of Wollumbin to see the sun rise in the east as it’s the first place in Australia you can see the sunrise. However, the mountain is sacred to the Bundjalung Aboriginal mob in that area and they ask you not to climb it. I always think it’s a shame that so many Western people ignore this request as they’d get plenty upset if people started climbing up Westminster Abbey or abseiling down from its roof. Wollumbin is the equivalent of a cathedral to Aboriginal people because it’s the land that’s important, not what’s built on it in concrete terms like houses, office blocks, etc.

Anyway, I decided to simply work with the photo I took of rainforest to try to recreate the feeling of ancientness as well as the feeling of the presence of so many spirit beings. I also wanted to  create some sense of the warmth and friendliness of this mountain – quite different to Mt Lindesay further inland which sort of crouches there with an invisible “keep off” sign. I’ve also included water images to represent the enormous forces that pushed this lovely mountain up to its present position, way above the Pacific Ocean. And finally I wanted to give some sense of the sacred nature of Wollumbin and its songlines which spread far and wide to light the path for spirit seekers.

Here’s the result, Spirit of Wollumbin.

Spirit of Wollumbin
Spirit of Wollumbin
Wollumbin viewed from the Border Ranges and looking to the Pacific Ocean.
Wollumbin viewed from the Border Ranges and looking to the Pacific Ocean.
Original photo of Wollumbin rainforest
Original photo of Wollumbin rainforest
Wollumbin as seen from the village of Uki
Wollumbin as seen from the village of Uki – Uki is on hte far right with a sort of witch’s hat