Magic of Nature

Magic of Nature

I’ve got a stinker of a cold which I’ve caught from my husband so I’m just doddling with art at the moment.

 

I decided I’d post a few pieces of digital art I’ve created over the past few months but never got around to publishing the images. This one I’ve called “Magic of Nature” because it reminds me of the variety in nature and the magic when we take time to listen, look and be sensitive to the natural world around us.

Mountain Magic

Mountain Magic

I am re-connecting with my relationship with rocks and crystals.  I have been making wire wraps for various stones in my care, and the above image is created from a photo I took yesterday of the sun shining onto the Besparmak Mountains.

For me, there is an energy and power in mountains – I can see faces, images and energetic beings. The above is my inner image of the magic of mountains, so often overlooked because we’re taught to see rocks, mountains and stones as lifeless things to be used, without realising how we are upsetting the balance in our relationship with the planet which supports and nurtures us.

It’s my belief that the rise in the popularity of crystal healing and the availability of a wide-ranging array of crystals, rocks and stones is a shamanic calling from these earth energies to humanity to recall our connection with the natural world and our responsibility to co-create with the energies that surround us.

When we work with crystal healing, we are not simply healing ourselves, we are aligning ourselves with the planet to effect healing on the wider world around us.¬† In the words of Rachel Pollack, in her book on her Tarot deck, The Shining Tribe: “To truly Know Stone means to transcend the illusion of a separation¬† between Spirit and the material world.”

 

Sun over Besparmak Mtns 1
Original photo of sunlight over Besparmak Mountains as storm clouds have moved to the east.

 

MagicLand

MagicLand

The image above is taken from a photo sent to me by a good friend of a road in Ireland known as The Dark Hedges. It’s actually a compelling and beautiful avenue of beech trees planted by the Stuart family in the eighteenth century. The trees have grown over towards each other to provide an archway of branches as you drive along the avenue.

It is quite an eerie sight when you look at The Dark Hedges and it’s why I’ve created a quite simple image from Hazel’s photo to reflect the otherworldly feeling you get when you see the road leading into the Dark Hedges. “MagicLand” seemed the most appropriate name, particularly given the significance of the fae folk in Ireland.

I came across this violet x-ray-looking image quite by chance on Pixlr and decided to stick with the simplicity of it, adding the rather web-like frame for it to add to the eeriness of the scene.

Here’s the original:

Dark Hedges 1